Tag Archives: dual electoral system

Still here / BC Election 2017

bc2017Finally got around to doing the 2017 BC election as under the Dual Electoral System. Out of the 87 ridings you have the following as the top two candidates in each.

Top two

Lib / NDP

NDP / Green

Lib / Green

Lib / Ind

Ridings

76

7

2

2

The following are the 11 ridings that were not Liberal / NDP as the top two candidates.

NDP / Green (7): Nelson-Creston, New Westminster, Vancouver-Mount Pleasent, Cowichan valley, Saanich North and the Islands, Victoria-Beacon Hills, Victoria-Swan Lake

Liberal / Green (2): West Vancouver-Sea to Sky, Oak Bay-Gordon Head

Liberal / Independent (2):

Peace River North elects a Liberal (Dan Davies) and Bob Fedderly.

Delta South elects a Liberal (Ian Paton) and Nicholas Wong.

I made the assumption that 80% of the Green vote would go to the NDP and the rest splits 50 / 50 where it’s the Liberal / NDP elected. The NDP vote goes Green and the Liberal goes 67% NDP and 33% Green. For the Independents they get all the NDP and Green vote the rest splits 50 / 50. The results are below.

Parties

Seats

Pop vote

Dual Seats

Dual leg votes

Liberal

43 (49%)

40%

80 (46%)

42%

NDP

41 (47%)

40%

83 (48%)

51%

Green

3 (3%)

17%

9 (5%)

6%

Ind

0 (0%)

3%

2 (1%)

1%

As stated in earlier posts, you can try it, before you buy it. The BC legislature forms the Assembly advisory council of 174 members with 2 from each riding. These being the top two candidates in each. All the other candidates transfer their votes to one of these candidates in their riding. In regular session each member has one vote. In legislative session each member has a number of votes equal to their popular vote plus any popular vote won by a candidate in their riding that got transferred to them. The advisory council in regular session advises the BC Assembly on procedural votes. The Council in legislative session advises the Assembly on whether to pass or defeat a bill up for a final vote.

Advertisements

Manitoba Election 2016

manitobalegThe results of the April 19, 2016 general election. Also the results using the Dual Electoral System. The Greens came second in 4 ridings, the Manitoba party in 2 ridings, and 1 Independent came second in the riding of Agassiz.

Party

Seats

Popular vote

Dual seats

Legislative vote

PC

40

53%

51

~ 53%

NDP

14

26%

42

~ 35%

Liberal

3

14%

14

~ 8%

Green

0

5%

4

~ 2%

Manitoba

0

1%

2

~ 1%

Independent

0

0.5%

1

~1%

36 Ridings: PC / NDP

9 Ridings: PC / Liberal

5 Ridings: NDP / Liberal

3 Ridings: PC / Green

2 Ridings: PC / Manitoba

1 Riding: NDP / Green

1 Riding: PC / Ind

Green party ridings:

La Verendrye – Janine Gibson / Midland – Stacey O’neill

Morden Winkler – Mike Urichuk / Wolseley – David Nickarz

Manitoba party ridings:

Arthur Virden – Frank Godon / Spruce woods – Malcolm Mckellar

Independent riding: Agassiz – Damian Dempsey

With an Assembly of 60 members and the top 2 elected from 30 ridings should give something like

Party

PC

NDP

Liberal

Green

Manitoba

Independent

Seats

26-27

21-22

6-7

1-2

0-1

0-1

Saskatchewan Election 2016

sask_election_2016The results of the 2016 General election. The one Independent is Jason Dearborn in Kindersley. The winner was Billy Boyd of the Saskatchewan party.

Party

Saskatchewan

NDP

Other parties

Ind

% of Vote

63%

30%

7%

0.4%

Seats

51

10

0

0

Dual Seats

61

60

0

1*

Dual Leg.votes

64-69%

31-36%

0

0.5%

Dual Electoral System

42nd Federal election results

Party

Liberal

Cons

NDP

Bloc

Green

Ind

Seats

184

99

44

10

1

0

Dual

301

223

128

21

2

1

House votes

54%

29%

13%

3%

0.3%

0%

Dual votes

51%

29%

18%

3%

0.5%

0.1%

With Liberal/Cons members elected the NDP & Bloc & Green go to the Liberals

Liberal/NDP members elected the Bloc & Green to NDP , Cons 2/3 to Liberals

Cons/NDP members elected the Liberal & Bloc & Green to the NDP

Liberal/Bloc members elected the NDP & Green & Cons 1/2 to each

NDP/Bloc members elected the Liberal & Green to NDP , Cons 1/2 to each

Dual Electoral System

A preference ballot is used for voting. The candidate with the number one on a ballot gets one vote. The two candidates with the most votes are elected. The ballots are counted a second time with the elected candidate with the lower number getting one vote. Each elected member will have one ” member vote ” in the House to be used in regular sessions and one ” legislative vote ” for each vote received on the second count of the ballots. These votes are voted when the House is in legislative session and is used to pass, what else, legislation! One day a week is set by the Commons for the legislative session and any bills requiring third reading are voted on during that session.

The main drawback of this system is if you keep the same number of ridings you will double the number of members or having the same number of members will double the size of the electoral ridings.

Benefits of the Dual Electoral System

  1. Guarantee of an opposition since no party can have more than 50% of the members.
  2. In regular sessions the members have one vote each so there will be non-partisan voting on the election of the Speaker, rules of the House (2/3 majority), procedural motions and committee membership.
  3. In legislative session you will have proportional representation since each member will have one vote for each vote received on the second count of the ballots.
  4. No party lists since your still voting for the Member of Parliament of your choice. One MP represents the majority vote in a riding and the other MP the main minority vote.
  5. No major revision of the electoral map. Ridings should only be altered when the number of electors in a riding is 50% or less of the number of electors in the largest riding. Each election few if any ridings will change. This will mitigate the political fighting over riding boundaries or size for the purpose of any real or imagined partisan gain.
  6. An incentive to vote since the more votes an MP gets the more votes they have on voting on legislation. Also ridings will increase their voting strength in the House if their voting turn out is higher than the average.
  7. All votes do count! If your first choice doesn’t get elected then one of the two candidates who did get elected will get to vote your vote because of the preference ballot.

If the dual electoral system were to be used it would have to be decided what the maximum size of the House of Commons should be. A House of Commons of 300 members would give you 150 ridings electing 2 members each. This results in an 11% reduction in the size of the Commons and a 125% increase in the size of the ridings. The Party standings in such a House would roughly be 134 Liberals, 99 Conservatives, 57 NDP, 9 Bloc, and 1 Green.

You can try it before you buy it by forming the House advisory council. This council to consist of the top two candidates for each riding. This giving a council of 676 members all having one vote in regular session. All the other candidates in each riding transfers their popular votes to one of the council members from their riding. This added to their own gives the number of votes they have in the council in legislative session. The Council in regular session advises the Commons on procedural votes and in legislative session advises the House on the passage of legislation.

 

42nd Federal Election

Dual Electoral System

https://federalistpartycanada.wordpress.com/2012/09/15/letters-to-pei/

Results 42nd Federal election October 19, 2015

Finished converting the results riding by riding from the election. I advocate a 300 member House of Commons elected from 150 ridings. If that was the case the election would have result in roughly 134 Liberals, 99 Conservative, 57 NDP, 9 Bloc, and 1 Green Members of Parliament.

Seats under current and dual electoral system

Seats

Liberal

Cons

NDP

Bloc

Green

Ind

Total

Current

184

99

44

10

1

0

338

Dual

301

223

128

21

2

1*

676

*Scott Andrews in Avalon (Newfoundland and labrador)

Votes in the House and legislative votes uder dual electoral system

Votes %

Liberal

Cons

NDP

Bloc

Green

Ind

Current

54%

29%

13%

3%

0.3%

0%

Votes #*

8,755

4,958

3,031

480

80

13

Dual

51%

29%

18%

3%

0.5%

0.1%

*In thousands of votes

With Liberal/Cons elected NDP & Bloc & Green go to the Liberals

Liberal/NDP elected Bloc & Green to NDP , Cons 2/3 to Liberals

Cons/NDP elected Liberal & Bloc & Green to the NDP

Liberal/Bloc elected NDP & Green & Cons 1/2 to each

NDP/Bloc elected Liberal & Green to NDP , Cons 1/2 to each

Alberta General Election 2015

o-ALBERTA-ELECTION-2015-facebookDual Electoral System

Voting is done by a preference ballot. On the first count of the ballots the top two candidates in each riding are elected. On the second count of the ballots the elected candidates get one vote for every ballot they have the lower number on. All the votes cast for the candidates who did not get elected are transferred to one of the top two candidates in that riding.

In the Legislature each member has one vote in regular session. In legislative session they have one vote for each of the votes they received on the second count of the ballots. The Legislature goes into legislative session every Thursday at 1 PM and during that session any bills up for a vote that week are voted on and passed or defeated. Any bills that were adopted by the Assembly are on the desk of the Lieutenant-Governor Friday morning for Royal assent.

Try it before you buy it. Form the Legislature advisory council. The members are the top two candidates from each riding. Each member has the one vote in regular session of the council. All of the candidates not on the council transfers their votes to one of the council members from their riding. All votes do get represented. These are voted when the council is in legislative session. Regular session votes advise the Assembly on procedural votes and in legislative session on votes to pass legislation.

Alberta General Election 2015

Party

Popular vote

Seats

Dual seats

Dual votes

NDP

41%

53 / 61%

71 / 41%

38% – 41%

PC

28%

10 / 11%

67 / 39%

41% – 44%

Wild Rose

24%

21 / 24%

33 / 19%

15% – 17%

Liberal

4%

1 / 1%

2 / 1%

1% – 2%

Alberta

2%

1 / 1%

1 / <1%

1%

Where the votes go on the second count of the ballots under the Dual Electoral System.

All the NDP vote goes to the PC candidate in the ridings where the top two are the PC and Wild Rose candidates. All the PC votes goes to Wild Rose where its the Wild Rose and the NDP. All the Wild Rose votes goes to the PC where the PC and NDP are the top two candidates. All the Liberal vote goes to the NDP

A clear majority votes for conservative parties but the Left-wing NDP gets 61% of the seats in the Legislature because of vote splitting. Wild Rose gets fewer votes then the PC but end up with more then double the seats. Time for a change. Time to try it before you buy it with the Dual Electoral System.

Under the Dual Electoral System the PCs would have ended up with a plurality of the votes in legislative session because of the transfer of votes from defeated Wild Rose candidates and some from the NDP in ridings where the top two candidates are the PC and Wild Rose. Together these conservative parties would have 56% – 60% of the votes in legislative session.

PEI General Election 2015

pei_mapAgain the disproportionate results produced by the first past the post system. A big majority votes against a Party yet they get a super majority of the seats and votes in the legislature. In the last PEI Provincial legislature I mailed, YES! the Canada post kind, all the MLAs with a letter detailing the Dual Electoral System. That system is again stated in a recent post on the Party blog of the Federalist party of Canada.

Voting is done by a preference ballot. On the first count of the ballots the top two candidates in each riding are elected. On the second count of the ballots the elected candidates get one vote for every ballot they have the lower number on. All the votes cast for the candidates who did not get elected are transferred to one of the top two candidates in that riding.

In the Legislature each member has one vote in regular session. In legislative session they have one vote for each of the votes they received on the second count of the ballots. The Legislature goes into legislative session every Thursday at 1 PM and during that session any bills up for a vote that week are voted on and passed or defeated. Any bills that were adopted by the Assembly are on the desk of the Lieutenant-Governor Friday morning for Royal assent.

In regular session in the last Legislature it would have been 50% Liberal and 50% PC. The operation of the Assembly is done on a non-partisan basis for no one party can gain a majority. In legislative session the Liberals would have had a solid majority and there is your proportional representation.

Try it before you buy it. Form the Legislature advisory council. The members are the top two candidates from each riding. Each member has the one vote in regular session of the council. All of the candidates not on the council transfers their votes to one of the council members from their riding. All votes do get represented. These are voted when the council is in legislative session. Regular session votes advise the Assembly on procedural votes and in legislative session on votes to pass legislation.

If PEI adopted the Dual Electoral System have 15 ridings for 30 members or 12 ridings for 24 members.

PEI Election 2015: What the Legislature advisory council would look like.

Party

Popular vote

Seats

Dual seats

Dual votes

Liberal

41%

18 / 67%

27 / 50%

42% – 62%

PC

37%

8 / 30%

26 / 48%

36% – 56%

NDP

11%

0 / 0%

0 / 0%

0%

Green

11%

1 / 4%

1 / 2%

2%

It is where the Green and NDP vote goes whether to the Liberal candidate or the PC candidate that would determine who gets a possible majority in the Assembly. If the Liberals get half they would have 52% of the legislative vote under the Dual Electoral System. Even if they got a 2/3 majority of these votes they would have 55% of the legislative vote.

59% vote against the Liberals and they get 67% of the seats. Time for a change. Time to try it before you buy it with the Dual Electoral System.