Tag Archives: electoral reform

Fair vote National council

Fair_Vote_Canada_logoI’m one of 15 candidates in the 2016 election for 8 seats on the National council for Fair vote Canada. To any members of Fair vote Canada, welcome! Any questions just ask email is president@federalistparty.ca.

I founded the Federalist Party in 2009 because none of the other parties had something I wanted (and I looked at all of them). This being a National Assembly of a Party that uses the new tools of the Internet to innovate the process of party governance. An online, duly constituted, deliberative,  rank and file members, parliamentary body that uses the Internet to debate and discuss and has online voting to render it’s decisions. I worked on a farm at the time and we all can’t just get away to attend meetings or conventions. Instead why don’t we……………. and the Federalist party of Canada. The other parties particularly the Conservatives and Liberals had a lot of things I didn’t like. If you want things done right, do it yourself, so I did. The purpose not being to put myself in a leadership position and not to have the policies I want but rather to belong to a Party that has a “National Assembly” where I as a activate rank and file member can participate and vote. Most importantly this body’s approval is required for all resolutions, all national by-laws,  and it and only it can amend the constitution of the Party. If it seems I have a chip on the shoulder it’s because I do and these are the people that charge things. Because the status quo is no longer acceptable and the great reformers are the ones that come up with the answer to the question “If not this, then what”? Thanks for the time Acting president Barry Aulis.

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Manitoba Election 2016

manitobalegThe results of the April 19, 2016 general election. Also the results using the Dual Electoral System. The Greens came second in 4 ridings, the Manitoba party in 2 ridings, and 1 Independent came second in the riding of Agassiz.

Party

Seats

Popular vote

Dual seats

Legislative vote

PC

40

53%

51

~ 53%

NDP

14

26%

42

~ 35%

Liberal

3

14%

14

~ 8%

Green

0

5%

4

~ 2%

Manitoba

0

1%

2

~ 1%

Independent

0

0.5%

1

~1%

36 Ridings: PC / NDP

9 Ridings: PC / Liberal

5 Ridings: NDP / Liberal

3 Ridings: PC / Green

2 Ridings: PC / Manitoba

1 Riding: NDP / Green

1 Riding: PC / Ind

Green party ridings:

La Verendrye – Janine Gibson / Midland – Stacey O’neill

Morden Winkler – Mike Urichuk / Wolseley – David Nickarz

Manitoba party ridings:

Arthur Virden – Frank Godon / Spruce woods – Malcolm Mckellar

Independent riding: Agassiz – Damian Dempsey

With an Assembly of 60 members and the top 2 elected from 30 ridings should give something like

Party

PC

NDP

Liberal

Green

Manitoba

Independent

Seats

26-27

21-22

6-7

1-2

0-1

0-1

Saskatchewan Election 2016

sask_election_2016The results of the 2016 General election. The one Independent is Jason Dearborn in Kindersley. The winner was Billy Boyd of the Saskatchewan party.

Party

Saskatchewan

NDP

Other parties

Ind

% of Vote

63%

30%

7%

0.4%

Seats

51

10

0

0

Dual Seats

61

60

0

1*

Dual Leg.votes

64-69%

31-36%

0

0.5%

Dual Electoral System

42nd Federal election results

Party

Liberal

Cons

NDP

Bloc

Green

Ind

Seats

184

99

44

10

1

0

Dual

301

223

128

21

2

1

House votes

54%

29%

13%

3%

0.3%

0%

Dual votes

51%

29%

18%

3%

0.5%

0.1%

With Liberal/Cons members elected the NDP & Bloc & Green go to the Liberals

Liberal/NDP members elected the Bloc & Green to NDP , Cons 2/3 to Liberals

Cons/NDP members elected the Liberal & Bloc & Green to the NDP

Liberal/Bloc members elected the NDP & Green & Cons 1/2 to each

NDP/Bloc members elected the Liberal & Green to NDP , Cons 1/2 to each

Dual Electoral System

A preference ballot is used for voting. The candidate with the number one on a ballot gets one vote. The two candidates with the most votes are elected. The ballots are counted a second time with the elected candidate with the lower number getting one vote. Each elected member will have one ” member vote ” in the House to be used in regular sessions and one ” legislative vote ” for each vote received on the second count of the ballots. These votes are voted when the House is in legislative session and is used to pass, what else, legislation! One day a week is set by the Commons for the legislative session and any bills requiring third reading are voted on during that session.

The main drawback of this system is if you keep the same number of ridings you will double the number of members or having the same number of members will double the size of the electoral ridings.

Benefits of the Dual Electoral System

  1. Guarantee of an opposition since no party can have more than 50% of the members.
  2. In regular sessions the members have one vote each so there will be non-partisan voting on the election of the Speaker, rules of the House (2/3 majority), procedural motions and committee membership.
  3. In legislative session you will have proportional representation since each member will have one vote for each vote received on the second count of the ballots.
  4. No party lists since your still voting for the Member of Parliament of your choice. One MP represents the majority vote in a riding and the other MP the main minority vote.
  5. No major revision of the electoral map. Ridings should only be altered when the number of electors in a riding is 50% or less of the number of electors in the largest riding. Each election few if any ridings will change. This will mitigate the political fighting over riding boundaries or size for the purpose of any real or imagined partisan gain.
  6. An incentive to vote since the more votes an MP gets the more votes they have on voting on legislation. Also ridings will increase their voting strength in the House if their voting turn out is higher than the average.
  7. All votes do count! If your first choice doesn’t get elected then one of the two candidates who did get elected will get to vote your vote because of the preference ballot.

If the dual electoral system were to be used it would have to be decided what the maximum size of the House of Commons should be. A House of Commons of 300 members would give you 150 ridings electing 2 members each. This results in an 11% reduction in the size of the Commons and a 125% increase in the size of the ridings. The Party standings in such a House would roughly be 134 Liberals, 99 Conservatives, 57 NDP, 9 Bloc, and 1 Green.

You can try it before you buy it by forming the House advisory council. This council to consist of the top two candidates for each riding. This giving a council of 676 members all having one vote in regular session. All the other candidates in each riding transfers their popular votes to one of the council members from their riding. This added to their own gives the number of votes they have in the council in legislative session. The Council in regular session advises the Commons on procedural votes and in legislative session advises the House on the passage of legislation.

 

PEI General Election 2015

pei_mapAgain the disproportionate results produced by the first past the post system. A big majority votes against a Party yet they get a super majority of the seats and votes in the legislature. In the last PEI Provincial legislature I mailed, YES! the Canada post kind, all the MLAs with a letter detailing the Dual Electoral System. That system is again stated in a recent post on the Party blog of the Federalist party of Canada.

Voting is done by a preference ballot. On the first count of the ballots the top two candidates in each riding are elected. On the second count of the ballots the elected candidates get one vote for every ballot they have the lower number on. All the votes cast for the candidates who did not get elected are transferred to one of the top two candidates in that riding.

In the Legislature each member has one vote in regular session. In legislative session they have one vote for each of the votes they received on the second count of the ballots. The Legislature goes into legislative session every Thursday at 1 PM and during that session any bills up for a vote that week are voted on and passed or defeated. Any bills that were adopted by the Assembly are on the desk of the Lieutenant-Governor Friday morning for Royal assent.

In regular session in the last Legislature it would have been 50% Liberal and 50% PC. The operation of the Assembly is done on a non-partisan basis for no one party can gain a majority. In legislative session the Liberals would have had a solid majority and there is your proportional representation.

Try it before you buy it. Form the Legislature advisory council. The members are the top two candidates from each riding. Each member has the one vote in regular session of the council. All of the candidates not on the council transfers their votes to one of the council members from their riding. All votes do get represented. These are voted when the council is in legislative session. Regular session votes advise the Assembly on procedural votes and in legislative session on votes to pass legislation.

If PEI adopted the Dual Electoral System have 15 ridings for 30 members or 12 ridings for 24 members.

PEI Election 2015: What the Legislature advisory council would look like.

Party

Popular vote

Seats

Dual seats

Dual votes

Liberal

41%

18 / 67%

27 / 50%

42% – 62%

PC

37%

8 / 30%

26 / 48%

36% – 56%

NDP

11%

0 / 0%

0 / 0%

0%

Green

11%

1 / 4%

1 / 2%

2%

It is where the Green and NDP vote goes whether to the Liberal candidate or the PC candidate that would determine who gets a possible majority in the Assembly. If the Liberals get half they would have 52% of the legislative vote under the Dual Electoral System. Even if they got a 2/3 majority of these votes they would have 55% of the legislative vote.

59% vote against the Liberals and they get 67% of the seats. Time for a change. Time to try it before you buy it with the Dual Electoral System.

New Brunswick Election

1024px-Flag_of_New_Brunswick.svgNew Brunswick General Election 2014 

Dual Electoral System results

49 Ridings / 2 Members per riding / top two elected/  98 MLAs
Liberals 45 / Conservatives 47 / NDP 3 / Green 2 / PA 1

43 Ridings  Liberal / Cons
2 Ridings  Cons / NDP
1 Riding  Lib / NDP
1 Riding  Lib / Green
1 Riding  Cons / PA
1 Riding  Green / Cons

In the 43 Ridings of Liberals / Conservative I assumed the following; NDP vote goes 67% to the Liberals, Green vote goes 75% to the Liberals, and the PA & Ind vote splits 50/50.

In the following Ridings I assumed the following; Liberal vote splits 50/50, Conservative vote goes 67% to the Liberals, NDP vote goes to the Green or PA, Green vote goes to the NDP or PA, and the PA & Ind vote always splits 50/50 between the two candidates.
Restigouche-Chaleur:  Liberal / NDP
Kent North:  Liberal / Green
Hampton:  Conservative / NDP
Fredericton-Grand lake:  Conservative / PA
Fredericton South:  Green / Conservative
Fredericton – West Hanwell:  Conservative / NDP

If the above is roughly true the Legislative vote in the New Brunswick Assembly would be
Liberals 53% / Conservatives 41% / NDP 3% / Green 2% / PA 1%

Compare: First past the post  VS  Dual electoral systemsnapshot22As always I suggest forming the Legislative Assembly Advisory Council. The top two candidates in each riding are members with 1 vote in regular session. All the other candidates transfer their popular vote to one of the members from their riding  which when added to their own popular vote becomes the number of votes they have in Legislative session of the Council. The Council in regular session advises the Assembly on procedural motions. The Council in legislative session advises the Assembly on whether to pass a bill into law. The advisory council allows you to try it before you buy it.

If New Brunswick adopted the Dual electoral system the Legislative Assembly should have 25 ridings giving you 50 MLAs. This last election would probably give you 24 Liberals 55% Leg vote / 24 Cons 41% Leg vote / 1 NDP 2% Leg vote / 1 Green 2% Leg vote.

Acting president: Barry Aulis

Quebec election 2014

 

Party

Liberal

PQ

CAQ

QS

Other

Vote

42%

25%

23%

8%

2%

Seats

70

30

22

3

0

Dual seats

100

88

54

7

1 (ind)

Leg vote

45%

30%

22%

3%

<1%

 

Vote is the percentage of the popular vote each party received. Seats is members elected by our first past the post system. Dual seats is members elected under the Dual Electoral System which elects the top two candidates in each riding so is 250 members for the National Assembly’s 125 seats. Each member has 1 vote in legislative session of the National Assembly for each vote received in the election. By either a run off election or a preference ballot voters cast a vote for one of the two elected candidates so the votes cast for the defeated candidates will get transferred to one of the two elected candidates.

The legislative vote is calculated from all the votes received by the top two candidates in each riding and deciding where the defeated candidates votes will go. The Liberals had 5% popular vote to be transferred. I decided to award 75% to the CAQ and 25% to the PQ. The PQ had 4% to be transferred so I put it 75% CAQ and 25% QS. The CAQ had 9% to be transferred I gave 67% to the Liberals and 33% to the PQ. QS had 6% to be transferred I awarded 67% to the PQ and the remainder split between the Liberals and CAQ. Th remaining 2% I gave equally to the Liberals and PQ. This gives you a rough idea of the distribution of votes and yes I went through the results riding by riding.

If Quebec ever adopted the Dual Electoral System I would suggest a National Assembly of 100 members being the top two candidates elected from 50 ridings. The smallest riding having 50% or more of the eligible voters compared to the largest riding.