Tag Archives: house of commons

Same old, same old

TE“Some are better, and some are worst, but in the end they are all the same.”

 

A question I haven’t heard in the comments on Mr. Trudeau’s action is Why was he out of his chair in the first place? The complete and total hypocrisy of any comments from any member of the Conservative party is lost on them.

Just like what I recommend for dealing with confirmation of appointments should be done for legislation. There is a set period of time for debate. The Commons by super majorities can shorten that debate and by minorities lengthen that debate. Something like this.

  • Automatic vote on a bill 180 days after introduction, unless the following
  • By a vote of 90% of the full House (303) bill is voted on 30 days after introduction
  • By a vote of 75% of the full House (252) 60 days
  • By a vote of 67% of the full House (224) 90 days
  • By a vote of 60% of the full House (202) 120 days
  • By a vote of 50% of the full House (168) 360 days
  • By a vote of 33% of the full House (112) 270 days
  • By a vote of 25% of the full House (84) 240 days
  • By a vote of 10% of the full House (34) 210 days

The Liberals by themselves don’t have the votes to bring a bill to a vote faster then the set 180 days. The opposition combined could set a bill vote back to 9 months after being introduced. The conservatives alone could lengthen the debate to 8 months and the NDP by itself to 7 months. If the Liberals got the agreement of the NDP they could pass a bill 90 days after it being introduced and with the Conservatives 60 days after introduction.

The majority can’t ram through and the minority can’t block.

“The power of democracy is vested in the majority and in the minority it’s principle.” Barry Aulis

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House of Commons committees

commonsfloor“Real Change” does it again.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/house-commons-standing-committees-list-1.3425906

Here’s the letter I just mailed (Yes, Canada post kind) to my Liberal MP and see what Mrs. Marie-Claude Bibeau is going to be worth.

Dear Mrs Bibeau:

I was truly shocked to read a news article on how the Commons committees were going to be done. What you are supporting is fundamentally wrong. I propose a different way of doing the committees of the House of Commons then what “Real Change” is doing now.

24 committees with 16 seats on each for 384 committee assignments

Party

House

Committee seats

Final seats

Fixed

Assigned

Liberal

184

209.04

209

8 (192)

17

Conservative

99

112.47 (+1)

113

4 (96)

17

NDP

44

49.99 (+1)

50

2 (48)

2

Bloc

10

11.36

11

0 (0)

11

Green

1

1.14

1

0 (0)

1

Independents

0

0.00

0

0 (0)

0

Total

338

382

384

14 (336)

48

There are a total of 384 seats on the 24 committees and they are to be distributed to the Parties in direct proportion to their seats in the House of Commons. Independents are treated as another Party in the House. A Party’s House seats is divided by the full House and multiplied by the number of committee assignments (384). The remainder is dropped and any extra seats to get to 384 are awarded to the party with the highest decimal remainder. A Party’s fixed number of seats on a committee is the minimum they will have on all committees and within parentheses the total number of seats. Assigned is the number of seats their House Leader chooses to bring their number of seats up to their seat total. There are 2 unassigned seats on each committee to be assigned by the Parties for a total of the last 48 committee seats.

The unassigned seats are chosen by the Party’s House Leaders in order of their Party’s standing in the House with one seat chosen by each in each round. First round goes the Liberal House leader, Conservative, NDP, Bloc, and the Green. If there were any Independents the most senior member would get to choose a committee assignment. The second round would be the Liberals chose one, Conservative, NDP, and Bloc. For the 3rd to 11th rounds there would only be the Liberal, Conservative, and Bloc. The Liberals and Conservatives choose the twelve last committee assignments in rounds 12 to 17. Each Party can choose only 1 unassigned seat on each committee.

The process to determine committee assignments for the members is done similar to the choosing of the unassigned committee seats. The Parties, round by round, choose committee seats in order of their standing in the House. At least half of the Party’s seats on each committee are chosen by the members themselves in order of their seniority in caucus. The House Leader or Deputy House leader assigns the remainder. These positions are to be elected directly by the members of that Party’s caucus by secret ballot in the House of Commons chamber. The winner by majority vote becomes that Party’s House Leader and the runner up the Deputy House leader. The Leader assigns the majority of the remainder and the Deputy leader the rest. If it’s 2 seats then it’s 1 seat assigned by each.

Party

Committee seats

Members choice

Leader assigns

Deputy assigns

Liberal

9

5

3

1

Liberal

8

4

3

1

Conservative

5

3

1

1

Conservative

4

2

1

1

NDP

3

2

1

0

NDP

2

1

1

0

Bloc / Green

1

1

0

0

In the first round of choosing committee assignments the most senior Liberal member chooses a committee to sit on. Then the most senior members of the Conservatives, NDP, and the Bloc Parties choose a committee seat. The Green party has only one committee assignment so that goes to its only MP. This process repeats with the next most senior members choosing a committee to sit on until all the committee assignments that are chosen by the choice of the members are filled. After that when a Party’s turn is up in a round it’s that Party’s House Leader the assigns a seat to a member. The next time after that the Deputy leader assigns one then back to the Leader the time after that. This continues until all the 384 committee seats on the 24 committees are filled.

This idea has it’s basis on what I thought about the situation in the 1980s for the US House of Representatives where the Democrats had a higher percentage of seats on the House committees then they had in the full chamber. Again fundamentally wrong and every member of a legislative body should get to serve on at least 1 of its committees.

Sincerely yours,

Michael Chong

Michael Chong MPMichael Chong MP for Wellington—Halton Hills has introduced a private members bill story here.

If you wont to change our politics you must first change the political parties.

I sent Mr. Chong the following email.

I read with interest about your private members bill it mirrors what has been done in the provisional constitution of the Federalist party of Canada.
The National Assembly is the members of the party who’ve registered to vote in the Assembly. The National congress is the candidates for the House of Commons. I think you might be interested in the following articles from the constitution.

5.8 By a majority vote in the National Assembly and an absolute majority in the National Congress in regular session any member may be suspended or dismissed from the Federal Council. This can also dismiss or suspend the Leader or Deputy leader.

11.3 The Leader shall sign all nomination and Election Canada papers. Any refusal shall mean the automatic and immediate expulsion from the Party.

11.4 The House caucus shall consist of all Party members who are members of the House of Commons. The caucus by an absolute two-thirds majority vote can suspend an MP from caucus. The Senate caucus shall be the same as the House caucus with the two making the Parliament caucus.

11.5 The House leader shall be elected by a secret vote of the House caucus. The runner-up in such a vote becomes deputy House leader. These two officers are members of the Federal Council. The Party caucus in the Senate shall do the same.

12.3 Key resolutions need two third majorities to be passed in the National Assembly, National Congress, and the Federal council. Key resolutions are motioned in the National policy committee. These resolutions form the National Party Platform and are binding upon a Federalist government and all Federalist MPs. Each Federalist MP can vote as they choose in the House of Commons. They may vote against a key resolution without penalty a number of times in each Parliament equal to the number of times they have been elected to the Commons.

Thanks Barry.