Tag Archives: Parliament reform

Dual Electoral System

42nd Federal election results

Party

Liberal

Cons

NDP

Bloc

Green

Ind

Seats

184

99

44

10

1

0

Dual

301

223

128

21

2

1

House votes

54%

29%

13%

3%

0.3%

0%

Dual votes

51%

29%

18%

3%

0.5%

0.1%

With Liberal/Cons members elected the NDP & Bloc & Green go to the Liberals

Liberal/NDP members elected the Bloc & Green to NDP , Cons 2/3 to Liberals

Cons/NDP members elected the Liberal & Bloc & Green to the NDP

Liberal/Bloc members elected the NDP & Green & Cons 1/2 to each

NDP/Bloc members elected the Liberal & Green to NDP , Cons 1/2 to each

Dual Electoral System

A preference ballot is used for voting. The candidate with the number one on a ballot gets one vote. The two candidates with the most votes are elected. The ballots are counted a second time with the elected candidate with the lower number getting one vote. Each elected member will have one ” member vote ” in the House to be used in regular sessions and one ” legislative vote ” for each vote received on the second count of the ballots. These votes are voted when the House is in legislative session and is used to pass, what else, legislation! One day a week is set by the Commons for the legislative session and any bills requiring third reading are voted on during that session.

The main drawback of this system is if you keep the same number of ridings you will double the number of members or having the same number of members will double the size of the electoral ridings.

Benefits of the Dual Electoral System

  1. Guarantee of an opposition since no party can have more than 50% of the members.
  2. In regular sessions the members have one vote each so there will be non-partisan voting on the election of the Speaker, rules of the House (2/3 majority), procedural motions and committee membership.
  3. In legislative session you will have proportional representation since each member will have one vote for each vote received on the second count of the ballots.
  4. No party lists since your still voting for the Member of Parliament of your choice. One MP represents the majority vote in a riding and the other MP the main minority vote.
  5. No major revision of the electoral map. Ridings should only be altered when the number of electors in a riding is 50% or less of the number of electors in the largest riding. Each election few if any ridings will change. This will mitigate the political fighting over riding boundaries or size for the purpose of any real or imagined partisan gain.
  6. An incentive to vote since the more votes an MP gets the more votes they have on voting on legislation. Also ridings will increase their voting strength in the House if their voting turn out is higher than the average.
  7. All votes do count! If your first choice doesn’t get elected then one of the two candidates who did get elected will get to vote your vote because of the preference ballot.

If the dual electoral system were to be used it would have to be decided what the maximum size of the House of Commons should be. A House of Commons of 300 members would give you 150 ridings electing 2 members each. This results in an 11% reduction in the size of the Commons and a 125% increase in the size of the ridings. The Party standings in such a House would roughly be 134 Liberals, 99 Conservatives, 57 NDP, 9 Bloc, and 1 Green.

You can try it before you buy it by forming the House advisory council. This council to consist of the top two candidates for each riding. This giving a council of 676 members all having one vote in regular session. All the other candidates in each riding transfers their popular votes to one of the council members from their riding. This added to their own gives the number of votes they have in the council in legislative session. The Council in regular session advises the Commons on procedural votes and in legislative session advises the House on the passage of legislation.

 

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Real Change Senate Appointments

g3403http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/senate-appointments-liberal-1.3496977

Just like Harper with Viceregal appointments the new Political Monarch (PM) creates a process for Senate appointments that doesn’t remove the PM of the day out of that process. The more things change the more the remain the same. The process is created by the PM of the day, changed by the PM, or cancelled at the pleasure of the PM and it still has the PM making the appointments so they can simply ignore the very process they create.

By an Act of Parliament the Governor-General makes Senate appointments on the advice of the House advisory council. This body is the top two candidates in each riding in the last election giving you the following membership.

Party

House seats

Council seats

% on council

Liberal

184

301

45%

Cons

99

223

33%

NDP

44

128

19%

Bloc

10

21

3%

Green

1

2

0.3%

Ind

0

1

0.1%

When a Senate seat goes vacant the two members from the same riding of any riding in that province or territory can nominate someone for appointment. The House advisory council by secret ballot votes yes or no for each candidate. To be recommended for appointment takes an absolute 2/3 majority (451) voting yes for that nominee. In the event of more then one getting 451 votes the one with the most votes is appointed. If there is a tie then the Governor-General has personal discretion to choose which of the tied nominees to appoint.

A non-partisan vote since no party can have more than 50% of the seats. The PM of the day will not create a process that removes the PM (Political Monarch) from the appointment process BECAUSE it removes the PM from the appointment process.

Fixed date elections

Unnecessary early elections caused by the political monarch (PM) in Japan and Israel. Japan’s last election was in December 2012 and for Israel the last election was January of 2013.

Instead have a fix date for elections just like we have for our municipalities and separate the vote for the executive and legislature. Again we do this for our municipalities it’s time to run our provincial and federal systems the same way.

A set election day for all elections in Canada say the first Monday of October of each year. In 2015 and every four years after you have the Federal elections. In 2017 and every four years after you have the elections for the provincial governments. In even numbered years you would have municipal elections. All occurring on the set election day.

Separate votes for the executive and the legislative just like we have separate votes for a mayor and the municipal council. This means getting rid of confidence motions since in effect confidence is set by a majority vote of the voters directly. Federally the candidates for the last election in each riding whether a by-election or the general endorses a council-designate of 16 to 20 members. These Councils are formed by any member of the House of Commons nominating an individual to form a proposed government. If they accept they appoint people to the ministerial portfolios in a council-designate of 16 to 20 members. When the Members of Parliament endorse a Council they have votes equal to their popular vote in the last election in their riding. The four most endorsed Councils get on the confidence-ballot. A significant catch is that no one on one of these Councils can run for the Commons simultaneously. Just as you can’t run for mayor and the city council at the same time.

In all likelihood this will give 3 council-designate on the confidence-ballot. The question being “Which of these council-designate do you have confidence in to serve as the Council of Ministers in the next Parliament of Canada”. You would have the choice of the Conservative party the Leader Stephen Harper, the New Democratic Party the Leader Thomas Muclair, and the Liberal party the Leader Justin Trudeau. A preference ballot where you mark your first choice, your second choice, and of course your last choice to form the next government. Count the ballots once and if no Council has a majority count a second time with just the top two. Winner becomes the Council of Ministers for the next Parliament and the runner-up the Council of Opposition.

No confidence motions but all members of the cabinet and the opposition council are subject to the disciplinary motions of reprimand, censure, suspension, and dismissal. A motion of reprimand requires an absolute 1/3 + 1 majority in the Commons (113 out of 338). A reprimand is the proverbial slap on the wrist. A motion of censure carries with it a loss of 1 weekly paycheck and requires an absolute majority (170). Each additional censure increases the loss of an additional weekly paycheck. You can be censured a maximum of 4 times in each Parliament. A motion of suspension takes an absolute 60% vote (203) and suspends the member for 90 days with the loss of pay for that time. You can be suspended a maximum 3 times in a Parliament. A motion of dismissal takes an absolute 2/3 majority to pass (226) and results in the member of the Council of Ministers or Council of Opposition being dismissed from office.

Revere the Leader

abortion-rights-trump-mps-freedom-to-vote-their-conscienceliberal-caucus-20140819Jus In the natural governing party you revere the Leader. The Liberals have learned nothing and its still the same old same old. But are any of the other parties any better?

12.3 Key resolutions need two third majorities to be passed in the National Assembly, National Congress, and the Federal council. Key resolutions are motioned in the National policy committee. These resolutions form the National Party Platform and are binding upon a Federalist government and all Federalist MPs. Each Federalist MP can vote as they choose in the House of Commons. They may vote against a key resolution without penalty a number of times in each Parliament equal to the number of times they have been elected to the Commons.

I have had this discussion before and what it comes down too is are you a Member of Parliament or are you a Member of Party? The answer is another more basic question the voters and taxpayers of Canada should ask. Who pays their salaries?

With the Federalist party of Canada what comes first is recognition that its the taxpayers who pay an MP’s salary and not the Party and certainly not the Party Leader. But they are also running as the Federalist’s candidate for the House so they are required to support the Party’s platform in Parliament. This support however is not and should not be the absolute that Mr. Trudue is dictating to the members of the Liberal party.

As the Federalist party’s constitution shows Federalist’s MPs can pass on a bloc vote of the caucus a limited number of times in each Parliament. Breaking party ranks beyond this brings the following penalties; first time 90 day suspension from caucus, second time 180 day suspension from caucus and National Congress, third time 1 year suspension of party membership, fourth time its bye bye you are in the wrong party!

Instead of Party discipline rigidity have a system that says you are both MP Member of Parliament and a Member of your Party. I repeat you are a Member of Parliament first why? Because where I come from the One that pays your salary is the one who gets to call the shots!

Barry Aulis

Fixed date elections

Image With the recent election in Quebec and the new one in Ontario we should should have fixed date elections like our municipalities and do away with elections called by the political monarch (PM or Premier) or by confidence votes. Have federal and provincial elections every 4 years. A federal election in 2015 and every 4 years after and provincial elections in 2017 and every 4 years after. Municipal elections to be held only in even numbered years. A set election date of the last Monday in October.

Election

Last

Term

Next

Term

Fixed

Federal

May 2011

4 1/2

Oct 2015

4

2019 +4

BC

June 2013

>

>

4 1/2

2017 +4

Alberta

April 2012

2 1/2

Oct 2014

3

2017 +4

Sask

Nov 2011

3

Oct 2014

3

2017 +4

Man

Oct 2011

3

Oct 2014

3

2017 +4

Ont

June 2014

>

>

3 1/3

2017 +4

Que

April 2014

>

>

3 1/2

2017 +4

NB

Sept 2010

4

Oct 2014

3

2017 +4

NS

Oct 2013

>

>

4

2017 +4

PEI

Oct 2011

3

Oct 2014

3

2017 +4

Nfld

Oct 2011

3

Oct 2014

3

2017 +4

Yukon

Oct 2011

3

Oct 2014

3

2017 +4

NWT

Oct 2011

3

Oct 2014

3

2017 +4

Nunavut

Oct 2013

>

>

4

2017 +4

At the start of each parliament hold a government election. A Leader forms a council-designate with the 4 most endorsed going to a vote. The third and fourth placed councils sworn in as executive councils. The top two going to a second vote. The winner becoming the council of ministers and the runner up the council of opposition for the duration of that parliament. No confidence motions. A motion of dismissal passed by a 2/3 majority can remove any minister from office. An absolute 2/3 majority can remove the Prime minister (206 / 308 next 226 / 338) or Premier (Quebec 84 / 125).

Crown Senate

senateWhat to do with the Senate of Canada? I should email this to all the former Liberal Senators but they are still Senators and they are still members of the Liberal party so whats actually changed? From The Fed the party’s wiki.

Parliament policy / Binding resolution

Title: Crown Senate

 Introduction

The current patronage Senate is to be abolished. The Parliament of Canada in law will establish two advisory bodies to replace it. The Federal senate will replace the current Senate in its capacity of representation by province. The Federal senate will be what is called the triple E Senate namely equal, elected, and effective. The Crown senate will replace the current Senate in its capacity as a chamber of sober second thought. The Crown senate will be non-partisan and not made by patronage appointment. The cost of running the current Senate will go to the advisory councils with each getting 50% of the funds. The salaries of the current senators will likewise go to the members of the advisory councils with each Council getting 50% to be paid equally to each member of that Council.

Be it resolved

It is the national policy of the Federalist Party that a Federalist government shall introduce into Parliament the following.

The Crown senate will advise the Governor General on Royal assent. The Governor General on the advice of the Crown senate can send a bill back to the House of Commons with or without recommendation. This is done by a majority vote of the Crown senate. If the House of Commons passes the bill a second time the Governor General on the advice of the Crown senate can send the bill back to the House of Commons with objections. This is done by a two-thirds majority vote of the Crown senate. If the House of Commons passes the bill a third time the Governor General shall give it Royal assent. The Crown senate can only delay legislation for a limited period of time. It can recommend and object but cannot defeat legislation passed by the elected chambers of Parliament. All crown senators cannot be members, donate, or participate in the activities of any political party.

The Crown senate will have 72 members. Half will be split among the provinces equally with the other half being distributed on the basis of population. Each province will get 3 seats, the three northern territories will get one Senator each, and three seats will be reserved for native Canadians for a total of 36 seats. Population distributes the other 36 seats. The 72 seats are allotted as follows British Columbia 8 seats, Alberta 7, Saskatchewan 4, Manitoba 4, Ontario 16, Québec 12, New Brunswick 4, Nova Scotia 4, Newfoundland 4, Prince Edward Island 3, the northern territories 3, and native Canadians 3. The electors for the Crown Senate are the top two candidates in each riding for the House of Commons. This gives you 616 electors. The membership of the current electors is 38% conservative, 36% NDP, 18% liberal, 7% Bloc, and 1% all others. When a seat goes vacant in a province than any elector from that province may nominate a candidate for that seat. When a seat goes vacant in the northern territories then any elector from any territory may nominate a candidate for that seat. When a seat goes vacant for native Canadians any elector may nominate a candidate. The electors by secret ballot vote yes or no for each candidate with the candidate with the most votes being elected. It shall take a two-thirds majority vote to elect a member of the Crown senate. They shall have a term of 24 years with 3 seats going up for election each year. Crown senators may serve only one term with the exception of a vacancy where the Senator appointed serves out that term and may be appointed to a full term.

Be it further resolved

If there is a Federal senate then by secret ballot the Federal senate in regular session that is one vote per Senator shall confirm by a two-thirds majority vote.

Summary

These two advisory councils are Try it before You buy it. You see how they would actually work as a part of Parliament before making a decision to amend the constitution of Canada. I would have a vote by Canadians in the 43rd federal election that being around 2019 on whether to have a Crown senate and in the 44th federal election around 2023 on whether to have a Federal senate.

Barry Aulis compton-stanstead / QC

barry@barryaulis.ca

Vote                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            The Founder authorized this national policy resolution with no votes in the National assembly, Congress, and Federal council.

 

This binding policy resolution shall apply only for the 41st Parliament.